Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Is It Now A Dead Art?

I am not pleased to have the thought that I am not optimistic about the future of tatting. Today, anyway.

There seems to be fewer blogs and most of the known commodity are familiar to us all, including mine; they display the same things, more or less, over and over again.

Not that they are not displaying beautiful tatting. No. Most of the tatting is truly lovely, but there is nothing new and innovative. Fresh. Dynamic.

I have no answers; I continue to ho-hum tat and tat. But I wish I could see or imagine creative avant-garde designs, patterns and something youthful and creative, instead of the old masters re-created again and again. I want to be wowed and mesmerized by tatting that has never been done before.

Now - some old-hat, kitchen-table tatting by me:


Buttons are keeping me busy and focussed. I really thought I was going to hang up my shuttles this Spring, but the buttons have inspired me and I am even going to order more thread . I am in the process of deciding which colours to purchase...


This pattern is Karey Solomon's and I had to tat it twice because I messed up this first one. I always make mistakes galore with her patterns on initial run:

First one


Second try
I have to add that since I was first inspired by Pamela Queuedo - TotusMel -  nine years ago, I continue to check her blog for new posts. Her work is the closest to being in the vein of what I am addressing - or trying to put into words that have some meaning about the creative process. Thank you, Pamela!

24 comments:

  1. I don't think tatting is dead yet, somehow we have to inspire you, I have not done a lot recently that's not to say I have been doing nothing. Have you thought about trying an ice drop that's the new thing in tatting. I might add there's some new patterns in the ice drops appearing every week.
    I am glad the buttons are useful and you are enjoying them. Your picture of buttons and motifs are lovely well done.
    As for tte old patterns, it's not inspiring me much either but it's nice to see them being reviewed even if I don't feel I want to tat them
    Perhaps a tat along might inspire you.
    Love to Mr G

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    1. Thanks for the response,Margaret. Than is not quite what I am trying to get at, and I am not doing it very well, I'm afraid.

      I don't need a tat-along. I like to tat.What I would like to see is a new form or use or application of tatting by some young , inspirational and gifted thread artist out there - like what happened in music when the Beatles arrived.... Or like what happens in sport when Roger Bannister arrived and old records are left in the dust! Something offside and astounding!

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  2. Something akin to what's happening in the crochet world perhaps. Designs by people like Janie Crowfoot made me completely rethink what was possible.

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  3. I see, you need something like double crochet stitch after having well learned the single crochet... I love old patterns but can understand this point of view, anyway it's a fact that tatting evolved in one century, we can't say what it will look like by another dozen years. Love your buttons, dear Fairy.

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  4. I'm sure there's room for everything in tatting, but I have to admit that my personal preference is for the traditional designs. If you manage to wing your way over to a meeting of the Qld Tatters in Brisbane you will see mind-blowing creations by Judith Connors - ( 3-d and inverted tatting) ,the most stunning cowl, entirely tatted by one of our members, Marie - ( I believe the picture has been shared on Craftree ), absolutely beautiful jewellery as tatted by our youngest members who , incidentally, are two of three identical triplets! - and exquisite work by many other people. Last year we included amongst our number a lady who tatted with sewing thread, on a pillow, rather like bobbin lace. She took bobbin lace patterns as her inspiration and tatted the designs. I think her work was of museum quality. Sadly she moved to another country and I miss seeing her work every month!
    I think creativity feeds off contact with other like-minded people and the sky's the limit.Perhaps people aren't blogging so much, but down on the ground, plenty is happening. Amazingly,many of our members are not connected to the internet at all.

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  5. Be the change, Fox! :)

    Maybe try mixing your zentangle ideas with your tatting in some way? Framed art? Or creating patterns that can be used to incorporate with clothing? Collars and cuffs? Trim around a hat?

    I know crazy talk . . . from a non-tatter (tatter wanna be?) who thinks your "ho-hum" tatting is brilliant. I hope you are able to find what you need to get that spark of creativity/inspiration going for you!

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  6. That's a pretty display. I love what Tattingweed is creating. I wonder if she will publish a pattern book soon. Her tatting is impeccable.

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  7. Very interesting post, it is understandable, what you are saying. I feel I have other things happening in my life to give as much time to tat. You may just be getting tired of it too. I do like some very different things the Asian tatters have come up with and I have thought of some things I feel are new. But it's fine to lose interest, over the years I have gone from sewing, wire porcelain dolls, cloth dolls water color and soap making. Some I return too and others I don't I am satisfied I know how to do many things. And as long as you are happy that is what is important. Also you don't have to give it up forever just take breaks. I do love these buttons and I did several snowflake ones and when I see these I do want to do more more๐Ÿ’ฎ๐ŸŒน๐Ÿ’ฎ

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  8. I like your ideas Fox and have gifted to a young, and I think very gifted artist #matte.molly some tatting samples to include in her artworks. I'm absolutely hopeless at art but am good with he "gentle arts". I'm hoping that she will eventually come up with something or even get interested enough in tatting herself.

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  9. Brilliant comments, dear Tatters! Thank you responding.❤️☺️

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  10. I understand what you're saying, but I hold out great hope for tatting in the future. All I have to do is spend some time tatting with kids and listening to their ideas. My favorite was when several third grade boys wanted to see how long a chain they could tat, which led to a discussion about measurement in inches, feet, and yards. Chains are not necessarily inspirational, but seeing the pleasure these boys took in their work was wonderful. In addition, whenever I sub I have kids who ask me what I am tatting.

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  11. P.S. ~ I have noticed that more tatters are connecting on Facebook instead of through blogging. I still prefer blogging, but I have been making connections on Facebook.

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  12. I don't know if tatting is dead yet. I think a lot of people switched to platforms such as Facebook instead of maintaining a blog. One thing I've noticed, as I'm sure you have too, is that many tatting designers are very "protective". I think that's the best way to word it. They create something new, and when others try to utilize the new pattern/technique, the whole copy write issue comes up. That new idea doesn't go anywhere. Some designers gave up designing completely because of copy write issues. Maybe some people need to be more open to having their designs reconfigured or built upon rather that everything has to be 100% original, never before seen. Tatting has a much more limited array of stitches and elements compared to knitting or crochet.

    I'm totally with you about seeing new patterns and ideas. I'm not a fan of most traditional patterns. Is there certain items that you would love to see a tatted version of?

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    1. Yes, good points. I am thinking about tatting that has never been seen before... I'm not the one to create it - I just notice that it's not out there and might never be! Just an observation. I'm not even complaining or being negative. I'm just looking at what's out there and to me, it all looks the same! Thanks for the input, Jeff.

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  13. I know what you mean! But I am optimistic as I see our local tatting group coming to life with new folks who want to learn to tat. I'm sure as new tatters get involved we will see some new, creative ideas. Just might take awhile ๐Ÿ’ฅ ๐Ÿ˜ฌ ๐Ÿค“

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  14. That's funny because I see a lot of innovation on facebook and instagram and I feel the opposite- like there's not enough time for all the things I want to try. I will tell you that having patterns stolen and shared as pictures on pinterest or other forums has made a lot of designers stop sharing or has made it less of a priority.
    Why not join the online tatting class this fall? Maybe you can participate in some innovation. There's always new ideas being shared in class.

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    1. Thanks for responding Victats! Nah - like I said to Jeff: I'm not the innovator. Just observing the landscape and pondering creativity - real unique creativity, not just new techniques. I hope it happens. It did on the crochet art world.... sculpture in yarn etc.... they are a far cry from doilies! ๐Ÿค—

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    2. Why don't you start here. Batatter has a tremendous collection of tatted sculptures and probably does 3d tatting the best. Make sure you see her fairies.
      http://battatter.blogspot.ca/search

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    3. Ah, yes! She is certainly a very talented tatter!

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  15. Check out some of the books that are being published in Japan. I think some of them are really innovative in technique and design. I like tatting flowers and a book that has recently impressed me is: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Tatting-Lace-Flower-Accessories-Japanese-Craft-Book-SP2-/192171511090?hash=item2cbe508d32

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    1. Thanks for that, Sarah. I agree with you about Japanese tatting books; they are terrific recently. I find the Japanese to be very inspirational tatters these days. ๐Ÿ˜Š

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  16. Although I love the old patterns, I love the fact that they are still being used most of all. Not everyone can design but these traditional patterns can easily inspire even a new tatter. Tatting and household linens were natural partners as well as clothing decorations. But today, it is the wearable tatting that is more popular. Tatting combined with beads for jewelry is trending higher daily, too. The possibilities for tatted items is simply endless. And the number of tatters grows exponentially with every post of FB or blog.

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